1. Two local hospitals among first slated to receive Moderna vaccine

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon and Jayna Smith

     

    Two Washington County hospitals will receive their first distributions of the coronavirus vaccine this week.

    Read More
  2. You’ve got mail

    One of the pleasures (and some of the pain) of punditry is the feedback I get from readers near and far. Here is a sampling from 2020, anonymized when it was an e-mail direct to me, as I do not have permission to share their identities.

    “Biden Crime Family” triggers responses

    Read More
  3. An interview with old St. Nick

    by Wayne Smith

    My yearly interview with Santa Claus on Christmas week.     

    The phone was busy — it took me a few times — but I got through to Santa Claus at the North Pole. One of the elves answered and told me that Santa was running on his treadmill, getting ready for his journey to the rest of the world on Christmas Eve as he delivers all the presents. Santa wanted to be in shape. The elves told me that Santa was listening to Christmas music on his iPod, wearing his red sweatpants and sweatshirt. As I waited, Santa called me back.

    Read More
  4. Bodman family donates piano to Washington Academy

    This is the season of giving, so it is fitting that on Friday, December 4, a beautiful Yamaha piano was delivered to Washington Academy’s Talbot Dormitory common area. The piano belonged to Mrs. Gloria Bodman, a dedicated musician, who taught music in the Machias area for decades. Mrs. Bodman recently relocated to Arizona. Her daughter, Lynn, grew up playing the piano and is ecstatic to know it is at Washington Academy (WA) and being appreciated by young musicians.

    Read More
  5. The Nature of Phenology: Needle ice

    by Joseph Horn

    Read More
  6. Martha Jane Foster

    November 12, 1936 - December 12, 2020

     

    Read More
  7. Winter sports season late, but still coming

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    High school basketball is the reigning monarch of the Downeast sports year, so it’s no wonder parents and athletes have been eagerly watching to see how — or if — this season will proceed, in light of the coronavirus pandemic. On Friday, Dec. 4, the Maine Principals Association (MPA) revised its November guidance and pushed out the start of team basketball practices from Dec. 14 to Jan. 4, but left “skills and drills” on the calendar to begin Dec. 7. Local schools are planning accordingly.

    Read More
  8. Basketball back at J-BHS; some remote learners’ parents unhappy

    by Nancy Beal

    There will be no mid-winter tourney in Bangor to look forward to in 2021 and no gold ball to bring home to a trophy case already full of them, but Royal basketball will return to the gym at Jonesport-Beals High School this week, after the Moosabec CSD board that governs the joint high school voted December 9 to allow the sport for which that school is legendary to go forward.

    Read More
  9. ‘Brutal honesty’ required to boost Maine’s economy

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Focusing on long-term growth and pervasive action, Maine’s annual Measures of Growth report signals ambitious goals for 2021.

    For landmark developments to take root, Yellow Light Breen, president and CEO of the Maine Development Foundation, says “brutal honesty and unquenchable optimism” will be required if necessary results are to be achieved. By law, the MDF is the staff of the growth council.

    Read More
  10. Cherryfield keeps holiday spirit alive for children

    by Natalie Boomer

    A Holiday Cheer Scavenger Hunt has begun in Cherryfield!

    All school aged children of the area are invited to grab a list from Mathew’s Store, the Cherryfield Library, or from the bulletin board at the post office, and start hunting.

    The list includes 16 questions to answer. Some of the questions asked are, “What is the number of the mailbox that is decorated in lights?”, “Where can you find a light up flag pole?”, and “Where is the memorial tree for our loved ones' past?”.

    Read More
  11. Town settled with former Machias dispatcher

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    A settlement agreement between the town of Machias, Teamsters Union Local No. 340, and former Machias dispatcher Tyler Wagoner was reached in late September, according to legal documents obtained by this newspaper.

    Those documents show the town of Machias paid Wagoner a total of $20,200 including a lump sum of $16,000, and the equivalent of 350 hours of sick leave, or $4,200. The documents offer no insight into the town’s rationale for the settlement.

    Read More
  12. DECH bids Dr. Rathod a fond farewell

    Down East Community Hospital bids a fond farewell to Urologist, Dr. Dhanvant Rathod, who gave 16 years of dedicated service to the hospital and the community.

    Read More
  13. Earthquake rattles Robbinston and beyond

    by Jayna Smith

    On the morning of Wednesday, Dec. 9, social media reports from many in the area noted “rattles” and “rumbles.” According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), a magnitude 3 earthquake occurred around 7:30 a.m.  It had a depth of roughly 4.784 miles.

    The epicenter of the quake was at Trimble Mountain, and its effects were felt as far away as Baileyville.  No damage was reported.

    Read More
  14. The sadness of entropy

    by Jonathan Reisman

     

    Things fall apart; the center cannot hold - W.B. Yeats

    Entropy is a concept from chemistry and physics that measures the state of disorder in a system. The second law of thermodynamics makes it clear that disorder in a system will increase over time without external intervention- or as more poetically put by poet William Butler Yeats, “Things fall apart; the center cannot hold”.

    Read More
  15. Cobscook Institute plans online creative program

    As we enter into the dark months of another Downeast winter, Cobscook Institute will build community and spark creativity through online community programming.

    Read More
  16. Local student raises funds to raise spirits for NICU families

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Read More
  17. Relief funds give greatly to feed Mainers

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Homelessness and hunger, tandem travelers in these times of COVID-19, are capturing the attention of many support groups and community partners.
    Maine itself has invested $536,000 in virus relief funds for Meals on Wheels. The  number of such meals has more than doubled just from October to November, now having served 102,000 meals to 5,500 people.  

    Read More
  18. Moosabec schools experiencing mixed attendance

    by Nancy Beal

    The three schools in Union 103 (Beals, Jonesport Elementary Schools and the joint high school) have been open for in-person learning since the Thanksgiving recess, but not all students’ families are sending them. The return to in-person attendance, decided by a joint committee composed of representatives from all facets of the schools, was prompted by reports from the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention that schools are safer than the community in this COVID-19 world.

    Read More
  19. Machias charity prepares to open Ugandan orphanage

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    A charity formed by the faith of one Machias woman has fed dozens of Ugandan street orphans every night for the past eight years. In that time Little Hands of Hope has also provided those orphans with medical care, clothing, vocational training, constructed wells to provide the community with clean drinking water, and built a brand new orphanage, too.

    Now founder and Director Kristen Johnson says years of working with local government regulations have led to her happiest announcement yet.  

    Read More
  20. Moosabec schools mull expensive repairs

    by Nancy Beal

    Read More
  21. Biden time

    by Jonathan Reisman

     

    In a couple of months, the Biden crime family will move into the White House and commence an effort to reverse and erase as much of the Trump years as executive orders, media sycophancy and deep state and judicial co-conspiracy can accomplish.

    Read More
  22. Cherryfield Fire Department gears up to host holiday events

    by Natalie Boomer

    The Cherryfield Fire Department is hosting a “Light Up the Night” holiday light parade on Saturday, Dec, 12, at 4:30 p.m.

    Community members are invited to decorate floats or their vehicles and light up the streets of Cherryfield to celebrate the holiday season.

    “It will be a vehicle, any type, and float parade, only with a longer parade route, which will be down Main Street and back up River Road,” said Mariah Curtis of the CFD. “We encourage anyone to participate and bring holiday cheer to town.”

    Read More
  23. The Nature of Phenology: Orion

    by Joseph Horn

    Read More
  24. Parade organizers determined to bring Christmas fun to area children Dec. 10

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    A weekend of torrential rain and wind canceled last Saturday’s Machias Parade of Lights, but its organizers are not quick to accept defeat. Instead, they have turned on a dime to plan a drive-through parade and toy giveaway for Thursday, Dec. 10.

    Read More
  25. Downeast nursing homes in prime spot on COVID-free list

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Although many of Maine’s nursing homes have achieved deplorable status in keeping COVID-19 out of their facilities, Marshall Healthcare and Long Point, two area facilities, have remained COVID-free.

    Read More
  26. Blueberry commission fields resistance from Canada on federal import probe

    by Nancy Beal

    The date for wild blueberry growers and processors to complete and return lengthy questionnaires into their businesses was extended from its original Nov. 16 deadline, but not much information was being sent at last month’s end. This was the signal according to Addison grower Marie Emerson, one of four new members on the Wild Blueberry Commission of Maine (WBC) that monitors and advises the activities of Maine’s wild blueberry industry.

    Read More
  27. WHRL Christmas Tree Festival and auction goes virtual

    by Natalie Boomer

    The annual Christmas Tree Festival and Auction held by the Women for Healthy Rural Living will still be taking place this holiday season, but not in person. The entire event will be going virtual.

    Read More
  28. Lubec legion to host children’s drive-thru Christmas

    by Natalie Boomer

    The Stuart-Green American Legion Auxiliary in Lubec will be hosting its third annual Children’s Drive-thru Christmas on Saturday, Dec. 5.

    “Our third annual kids Christmas party is still being held this year, but it’s going to be a bit different,” said auxiliary officer Shona Feltner.

    To ensure social distancing, certain precautions and CDC guidelines will be followed.

    Read More
  29. New ACO, new dispatchers top Machias agenda

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    In her first meeting since returning from medical leave, Machias Town Manager Christina Therrien asked the Machias Board of Selectmen if they wanted to sponsor the Deck the Falls decorating event.

    “It’s an event where we encourage local residents and businesses to get into the spirit of the holidays and decorate,” said Therrien during the board’s Zoom meeting held Nov. 18. “This does cost us roughly $500 in prizes that we generally pay from the selectboard contingency fund.”

    Read More
  30. Walgreens offers rapid COVID-19 testing

    by Jayna Smith

    The Maine Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has recently partnered with some Walgreens locations across the state to offer free drive-through rapid COVID-19 antigen testing. This includes the Calais and Machias Walgreens locations.

    The Calais Walgreens was one of the first ten to initially have the testing available. Machias was added late last month, bringing the total of Maine Walgreens locations offering the testing to 65.

    Read More
  31. Community plans to come together to celebrate young girl’s birthday

    by Natalie Boomer

    Like many others, a young girl's birthday party was suddenly canceled after Governor Janet Mills urged Mainers to avoid gatherings and unnecessary travel to decrease the spread of COVID-19.

    Although Sutton Farmer won’t be able to have all of her friends at her sixth birthday, her close family friend Terri Beam thought of a different way to celebrate.

    Read More
  32. With climate policy central to the incoming presidential administration, Maine can expect more federal support to implement its new Climate Action Plan

    by Marina Schauffler

    Editor’s Note: This article is reprinted with permission of the Maine Monitor. The Maine Climate Council is submitting its Climate Action Plan to the Legislature on Dec. 1. Topics related to the plan have been covered this fall in a Maine Monitor series of columns called Sea Change.

    Read More
  33. Giving thanks

    Thanksgiving this year was unique and I hope it will not be the new normal, but the tradition of acknowledging my blessings and expressing gratitude remains.

    Life

    Read More
  34. The Nature of Phenology: Red vs. gray foxes

    by Hazel Stark

    Read More
  35. Targeting free speech

    by Jonathan Reisman

    Ending freedom of speech is on the agenda for the Harris-Biden crime family, the Democratic Party and the left.  Joined by Big Tech, the legacy media and the League of Women Voters, our progressive betters will continue their hypocrisy of wailing about evil corporate political spending and dark money even while extensively utilizing them in Maine, Georgia and across the nation. If they are successful in gaining control of the Senate, freedom of speech will be severely curtailed.

    Read More
  36. To protect land access, wardens urge ethical hunting practices

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Tanya Millay was alarmed last week when she left to drive her daughter to school. There, crawling slowly past her Machiasport neighborhood, was a line of hunters in their trucks, all watching a buck on someone’s lawn. Some of the hunters had scopes and shotguns with them, and one had a bow and arrow.

    Read More
  37. UMM steps up to offer COVID testing on campus

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Because COVID testing in Calais was too far away for many trying to hold down a job in the Machias area, the University of Maine at Machias (UMM) has stepped up to the plate to offer the service.

    “I am really glad that UMM will be able to provide this much-needed service to the community,” Daniel Qualls, head of campus, said last week.

    Read More
  38. High COVID-19 case count keeps Moosabec schools remote

    by Nancy Beal

    Jonesport’s number of positive Covid-19 cases reached the Maine Center for Disease and Prevention’s (MECDC) second category of case numbers within a zip code at the beginning of the week of November 9, and school nurse Holly Swillo confirmed that there was community spread in the Moosabec area. (The MECDC defines community transmission as existing when the are at least 10 confirmed cases and that at least 25 percent of those cases are not connected to either known cases or travel.)

    Read More
  39. Sign offers reminder that cornerstone American principles still persist

    by Jayna Smith

    In a time of great political divide and amidst a pandemic, when we are told to keep six feet apart, the distance between Americans, metaphorically speaking, has become miles longer. Tensions are high and fear has intensified. But for one Calais couple, a simple yard sign gives a much-needed reminder that compassion and cornerstones of American life are still in existence.  

    Read More
  40. Volunteers needed to set up inflatable Christmas village

    by Natalie Boomer

    Kickoff the holiday season by lending a helping hand and setting up Danny’s Inflatable Christmas Village in Machias.

    “This is the project's third year and it has grown larger and larger,” said Sharon Mack, previous executive director of the village.

    Mack is looking for 10 to 12 volunteers to attach the blowup decorations to the fence and pallets by the boxcars in downtown Machias on Saturday, November 28th.

    Read More
  41. Border to remain closed for at least another month

    by Jayna Smith

    As many likely expected, travel restrictions between Canada and the United States have been extended until Dec. 21 in an effort to stop the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau tweeted, “We’ve extended the current border measures by another 30 days.  Non-essential travel between our two countries remains restricted until at least Dec. 21.”  

    Read More
  42. Lobster tales and lobster facts featured in two new books

    Lobsters and lobstering connect two new books from Penobscot Books of Stonington this holiday season.

    Read More
  43. Festival of Ornaments' Workshop Trio invites all to join from home

    EAC’s ‘Festival of Ornaments,’ a trio of Zoom-based workshops for all ages, is being offered in the spirit of the center’s annual Festival of Trees, with deluxe materials kits available for participants, or detailed information available for those who’ll use their own materials from home.

    Read More
  44. Santa letters, Christmas gift bags at Jonesport library

    by Nancy Beal

    Peabody Memorial Library has placed a dropbox for letters to Santa Claus at its main entrance on the road to the Ball Diamond. Children may place their letters to Santa in the special box through December 19. Letter writers are reminded to include their return address so that Santa will know where to reply.

    Read More
  45. The Nature of Phenology: Porcupines mating

    by Hazel Stark

    Read More

Pages

Pages