1. Generosity means more fresh food for families

    In May 2021, Downeast Community Partners (DCP) received word that the Good Shepherd Food Bank (GSFB) awarded DCP’s Nutritional Services $15,800 for capacity building. Heather Barton-Lindloff, Nutritional Services, manager says, “The funding of this project means that we can improve and expand existing services, in turn this means promoting a healthier community.”

    As families’ needs increased during COVID-19, DCP expanded food related programs; however, those changes were met with limitations.

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  2. Augusta supports Critical Race Theory (CRT) indoctrination

    by Jonathan Reisman

     

    Shocker: Dems support it, GOP (mostly) opposes

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  3. Machias Wild Blueberry Festival organizers plan for 2022 event: ‘bigger and better than ever’

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Following the cancelation of the Machias Wild Blueberry Festival for the second year in a row, many have feared the iconic harvest festival might never return. But never fear, says festival director Ellen Farnsworth. The Machias Wild Blueberry Festival will be back in 2022, and better than before.

    “I’m getting contacted three and four times per week from new vendors that want to be a part of the 2022 festival,” said Farnsworth. “So that’s exciting, we’ll probably see lots of new faces next year.”

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  4. The Nature of Phenology: Labrador tea blossoms

    by Joseph Horn

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  5. Jonesport cat catcher builds her wards a home

    by Nancy Beal

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  6. Unanimous Judiciary vote pushes disputed DA bill forward

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Better access to justice in Washington County, says Rep. Will Tuell, means Downeast Mane needs two district attorneys.

    A years-long debate has hinged on the issue that Washington and Hancock counties, having long shared a DA, now each need their own. “I’m thrilled with the support,” says Tuell, sponsor of LD 272, An Act to Establish Separate Prosecutorial Districts in Downeast Maine. “We  could elect our own district attorney in November 2022.”

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  7. Santa’s Helpers Program receives donation from Red Knights Charity Ride

    by Jayna Smith

    Downtown Calais rumbled loudly on Saturday morning when the Red Knights Maine Chapter 5 motorcycle club hosted a ride in memory of Blaine McLaughlin.  

    The ride saw around 50 bikes and nearly ten other vehicles that took off from Papa’s Auto on Main Street in Calais.  The group made its way down Route 9, across the Cooper Road to 191.  From there, they proceeded to Pembroke via 214 and back along Route 1 to Papa’s Auto.

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  8. Peabody Memorial Library art auction, book sale, fish tasting

    by Nancy Beal

    Jonesport’s Peabody Memorial Library is full of artwork these days, all part of a silent bidding auction from now through July 17. The subjects range from the traditional boat and shore scenes that this seaside area traditionally inspires through illustrated mottoes to a couple of abstracts. They are the product of Laura Fish’s art students at Beals Elementary School, professional painters who live in the area, and six posthumous panels done in decoupage.

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  9. Green Energy Policy Meets TANSTAAFL

    by Jonathan Reisman

     

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  10. Workshop series, youth arts camp announced

    EAC is thrilled to announce our Summer Workshop Series, to be offered June 29 through August 17 at the center, in accordance with CDC guidelines for safe gatherings. In addition to the center’s usual Tuesday afternoon offerings, there will be a special Sunday afternoon workshop in late July, and a four-day Summer Arts Camp for youth.

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  11. Maine Community Foundation donates $10,000 to Incredible Edible Milbridge

    Women for Healthy Rural Living (WHRL) has been awarded a $10,000 grant from the Maine Community Foundation for their Incredible Edible Milbridge project.

    “Support from the Maine Community Foundation translates to expanded food production for the 2021 growing season.  This means we can feed more of our neighbors,” said WHRL executive director Christine Kuhni. “The gardens have become a point of pride for local residents, providing food, educational experiences, and a sense of community.”

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  12. Joe Piscadlo selected as 2021 Norman W. Duzen Community Service Award recipient

    The Washington County Extension Association will hold its annual meeting virtually, featuring the Norman W. Duzen Community Service Award, on Tuesday, June 22, beginning at 6 p.m.  

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  13. The Nature of Phenology: Buttercups

    by Hazel Stark

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  14. Jane Ellen (Magner) Kamm

    Jane Ellen (Magner) Kamm
    August 23rd, 1940 - May 20th, 2021

     

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  15. Beals moratorium puts halt to windmills

    by Nancy Beal

    In a special town meeting preceded by a public meeting May 25, Beals voters adopted a six-month moratorium on the erection of windmills, during which time town officials will draft a windmill ordinance to present to the town for approval. Another measure called for an outright ban on windmills on the two linked islands that house the town’s living quarters—Great Wass and Beals Island (the latter of which some in the audience were surprised to see identified on the meeting warrant as “Little Wass”).

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  16. After embattled years, she’s reaching out to give back

    by Ruth Leubecker

    As substance abuse dominates the front pages, infecting a growing number of troubled lives, it is noteworthy to hear about a success story. Jamie Corbett of Marshfield is a practitioner from all angles. Her youthful substance abuse became a traumatic battle to survive. Hers is a story of hope and positive accomplishment, worth telling as a beacon for others to exemplify. After setbacks and relapses, she did more than just survive; she became a drug counselor and impassioned champion of others waging the same war.

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  17. School sports facing numbers crunch

    by Phil Stuart

    It is not too far-fetched to think in the very near future that high school baseball and softball might become extinct in some area schools. For some reason, fewer students are involved in athletics today. Spring sports occur at a time when many students are anxious to get out of school, and if they play at this time of year, in their minds it might prolong the school year and shorten their summer vacation.

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  18. Vaccination record refused at Canadian border

    by Jayna Smith

    The border with Canada has been closed since March of 2020 for all but essential travel.  Falling under the category of essential includes media, an important means for citizens to obtain information about safety and welfare, as well as other critical information.  

    For one local businessman, Pierre Little, owner of The Calais Advertiser and Machias Valley News Observer, the regular cross into St. Stephen from Calais was not allowed, despite proper credentials and a U.S. CDC-issued vaccination card.  

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  19. Jonesport news: working waterfront, comprehensive plan

    by Nancy Beal

    Jonesporters hoping to turn part of the town campground on Henry Point into a commercial fishing hub got some good news last week: the grant givers they hope will help finance the project agreed to an extension of the application deadline. The current marina is owned by the state and is designated a recreational facility. Town fathers and fishermen fear that they could lose the use they currently make of it.

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  20. Notes on the current crisis

    Democratic Senators and Sanders, King and Collins vote to confirm Lying Anti-Semite racist to Top Department of Justice Civil Rights Job

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  21. EAC video profiles artist Cynthia Morse

    The latest in EAC Video’s Studio Visit series is Cynthia Morse, pastel painter, who recalls her earliest artworks, the exploration of many art forms in her 20s, and her eventual choice of pastels as a primary media. (Cynthia is still a media experimenter, and spent some of the pandemic time dyeing roving and creating large felted pieces!).

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  22. National Book Award-Winning Novelist’s Life Story Unveiled

    On Tuesday, June 15, at 6 p.m., the Camden Public Library will host Maine author Robin Clifford Wood for an online book talk and narrated slideshow about her new book The Field House: A Writer's Life Lost and Found on an Island in Maine. The book is a compelling blend of biography and memoir recounting the remarkable life of writer Rachel Field. The story is told by the woman who lived in Field’s old island home in Maine, sparking a unique sisterhood across time. Email [email protected] to request a Zoom link to attend.

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  23. Silent auction to benefit Healthy Acadia’s Downeast Gleaning Initiative

    Healthy Acadia is hosting an online, “Healthy Food For All” silent auction throughout the month of June to raise funds to support the Downeast Gleaning Initiative. Up for bid are an array of enticing local experiences, including a private, four-course dinner for eight people prepared by Sassafrass Catering, an overnight stay in Lubec, fresh Maine lobster, a Bar Harbor getaway package, and a lakeside sauna and dinner at Kendall Farm Cottage on Boyden Lake.

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  24. The Nature of Phenology: Alder leaf beetles

    by Joseph Horn

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  25. Milbridge issues early invite for others to join their parade

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Although there may be no blueberry festival this season and no lobster festival, Milbridge Days promises a big shebang, with an exciting theme, plus The Codfather.

    The annual multi-faceted celebration, held this year from July 27-31, hopes to attract many parade participants beyond Milbridge.

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  26. DC Interlude

    My wife and I traveled to Washington, D.C. for a Wuflu delayed family reunion with our sons and their plus-ones. What follows are my notes and observations after five days of following my promise to my wife to say nothing in response to the pro-BLM, pro Critical Race Theory, anti-capitalist, anti-Constitutional millennial ravings of our progeny and the possible mothers (excuse me, birthing persons) of our grandchildren, should we be so blessed.

    Bangor

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  27. PRSWDD and other waste groups grapple with Hampden plant ownership change

    by Nancy Beal

    The Pleasant River Solid Waste Disposal District (PRSWDD) is a small entity with a big name and a recent history of many problems, some solved, some pending. Those worries have ranged from non-functioning truck scales and an unstable wall that denies the plant insurance to the withdrawal of two of its six member towns and the in-progress retreat of a third. (Of the original six, Addison, Jonesboro and Beals remain. Jonesport and Columbia Falls pulled out last year, and Columbia is in the progress of leaving.)

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  28. Wildfire put out by local departments, forest service

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Unusually dry conditions likely contributed to a wildfire that spread through nearly 18 acres of Northfield and Wesley last week. The cause of the fire is still under investigation.

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  29. Sipayik Elementary School teacher named 2021 Washington County Teacher of the Year

    Sipayik Elementary School also known as Beatrice Rafferty School Teacher Diana Mahar is the 2021 Washington County Teacher of the Year, announced during a virtual ceremony Wednesday, May 12.

    The Maine Teacher of the Year program honors the contributions of Maine Teachers. The County Teacher of the Year is committed to excellence and nurture the achievements of all students and his/her exemplary skills inspire students and colleagues.

    Ms. Mahar has been teaching at Sipayik since 2014 and currently in her 4th year of teaching 5th grade.

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  30. Free outdoor day camp for girls at the Milbridge Commons

    Women for Healthy Rural Living (WHRL) and Maine Outdoor School, L3C, (MOS) are excited to announce that registration is now open for OWLette, a free summer day camp for girls. Owlette will happen twice this summer, and participants will gain outdoor, gardening, and naturalist skills while learning about climate change. The first session will be June 28 through July 1st and will be for girls ages 11 - 16.

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  31. Wild Blueberry Heritage Center invites your stories

    The Wild Blueberry Heritage Center and Museum, a community-minded nonprofit showcasing one of Maine’s most iconic crops, invites your stories and your stuff.

    That is, if you raked blueberries every August in your childhood, or if you have old rakes or winnowers or boxes needing a new place besides your old barn – you are welcome to contribute both memories and items, including photographs, to the museum’s exhibits.

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  32. Stage East to open EAC 2021 season with one-person plays

    Stage East proudly returns to the theater with two in person offerings this June. Krapp’s Last Tape by Samuel Beckett and The Human Voice by Jean Cocteau will be played back-to-back June 4, 5 11 and 12, at 7 pm, and June 6 and 13 at 2 pm. Both plays are short one-person works that deal with themes of isolation and technology, and are being mounted by a vaccinated cast and crew with strict adherence to CDC guidelines to create a safe and enjoyable night of theater for attendees.

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  33. The Nature of Phenology: Cherry blossoms

    by Joseph Horn

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  34. Machias selectboard names Bill Kitchen interim town manager

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    By unanimous vote at a meeting held Tuesday, May 18, the Machias Board of Selectmen appointed former selectman Bill Kitchen as interim town manager. 

    Former town manager Christina Therrien vacated the position on Friday, May 15, six weeks earlier than expected.

    Board chairman Joshua Rolfe raised Kitchen’s name first at Tuesday’s meeting, detailing his qualifications.

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  35. Machias launches interim search after town manager resigns early

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Former Machias Town Manager Christina Therrien issued a 110-day notice of resignation in March, but shortened that timeframe with a written resignation notice sent Friday, May 14, effective immediately.

    The resignation followed a tense meeting held on the evening of May 12, when the four-person selectboard went into executive session with town counsel Sarah Newell of Eaton Peabody. Returning to the waiting audience on Zoom, selectboard chairman Joshua Rolfe asked Therrien to go into an executive session with the board.

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  36. Americans on mask honor system

    by Jayna Smith

    Many felt relief last week with the step closer to normalcy when the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced that those who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 can stop masking and social distancing in most situations.

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  37. Mixed signals, myriad issues mark Gov. Mills’ path forward

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Prioritizing education and honoring a promise unmet for 15 years, Gov. Janet Mills unveiled her $8.8-billion budget to much bipartisan fanfare.

    It was an historic investment in education, with $187 million going to public schools, and satisfying a 55-percent long-standing obligation.

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  38. Beals officials seek windmill moratorium; harbor law revised

    by Nancy Beal

    Beals selectwomen have been reviewing the town’s ordinances, both existing and future planned. Next week, townspeople will be asked to impose a 180-day moratorium on the application of windmill permits in order to give the town time to draft and pass rules that would govern their installation. A public information session on the need for such a moratorium, followed by a town vote on it, is scheduled for 6 p.m., Tuesday, May 25 in the town office meeting room.

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  39. Machias votes in favor of Bad Little Brewing grant application

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Machias residents voted overwhelmingly to support a Community Block Development Grant (CDBG) application on behalf of Bad Little Brewing Company, a craft beer and farm-to-table restaurant soon to be located at 101 Court Street in the historic Clark Perry House.

    The dining and taprooms will be located in the property’s barn, which will be moved to begin construction on a new foundation as early as next week.

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  40. T/S State of Maine arrives in Virginia, sets course for Maine

    The Training Ship State of Maine (TSSOM) arrived in Norfolk, Virginia, last week under blue skies and fair weather. The vessel sailed past the Norfolk Naval Station and into Lambert’s Point, navigating through one of the busiest ports on the Eastern Seaboard.

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  41. Army Veteran is also family man, teacher, superintendent, and inn owner

    It was a thankful day indeed for the parents of Richard “Dick” Holbrook Grant, who was born Nov. 24, 1927, in New Briton, Connecticut, two days before Thanksgiving,

    His father was a teacher, and his mother stayed at home to care for Dick and siblings Robert, Leighton, and Madeline. The Grants moved more than 400 miles to Columbia Falls, Maine, when Dick was just six months old.

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  42. Responses to unequal justice and call for defunding FBI

    Last week’s column argued that that the FBI and Department of Justice were systemically biased against right of center Americans and called for their defunding because their unequal administration of justice is a recipe for tyranny.

    I shared my concerns with Representative Golden and Senators King and Collins. Senator King has not deigned to respond.  Senator Collins acknowledged receiving my concerns. Rep. Golden wrote a lengthy response arguing for the passage of HR1 and claiming credit for fighting corruption.

    Here are their unedited responses.

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  43. Uncle Stanley talks blueberrying then and now

    by Wayne Smith

    I have to look back this week. I think about my Uncle Stanley as he talked about blueberrying in the day. Stanley is the only living uncle on my father’s side of the family. He always has been a special uncle now and in the day. This week I would just like to honor him. This is my favorite article on my uncle that I ever wrote. It’s kind of a late birthday present and captures a family's tradition and a little bit more.

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  44. In Calais, authentic Mexican food truck off to strong start

    by Jayna Smith

    Folks who have been in downtown Calais lately have surely seen the new food truck on Main Street. Lined with colorful decor, the small trailer named Mama Lola’s Mexican Food Truck sits next to Triangle Park.

    Don’t be fooled by its size, however. What it lacks in kitchen space, Mama Lola’s compensates in flavor with an authentic Mexican-food experience.
    Owner Manuella “Mannie” Medrano is a first-generation Mexican-American. “My mom was from Mexico, my grandma was from Mexico, my dad was from Mexico,” she said.

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  45. The Nature of Phenology: Goldthread

    by Joseph Horn

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