1. Tick season: Take precautions to prevent Lyme Disease

    by Jayna Smith

    Warmer weather usually means more time spent outside.  With that should come the habit of checking for ticks, small bloodsucking parasites, many of which transmit diseases to people and to pets.

    Griffin Dill, pest management specialist for UMaine’s Cooperative Extension, explained that ticks generally spend the winter months in a state of dormancy among the leaf litter under the snow.  If temperatures are above 40 degrees for an extended period, ticks can become active, even during the winter.

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  2. 3 local girls shine at Maine State Science fair

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    MacKenna Carter wasn’t always interested in science, but you wouldn’t believe it to hear her speak today. She designed her state science fair project to examine natural alternatives to man made water repellents.

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  3. Aroostook County couple to manage Jonesport’s oceanside campground

    by Nancy Beal

    After weeks of advertising recently for a director of the Jonesport campground and getting no response, selectmen spent less than five minutes April 23 approving the offer from a retired couple in the Houlton (Aroostook County) area to manage the popular summer spot on the Henry Point peninsula across Sawyer’s Cove from the marina.

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  4. Participate in the 2021 Spring Trail Challenge for a chance to win a prize

    by Natalie Boomer

    Looking for something fun to do outside?

    Downeast Coastal Conservancy has created the 2021 Spring Trails Challenge for those who want to get out and explore as warmer months approach.
    Seven items have been hidden on trails throughout Downeast Maine.

    These “tree cookies”, as staff call them, feature different animals that are native to our great state of Maine.

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  5. Enemies foreign and domestic II

    by Jonathan Reisman

     

    “I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic…”- Oath of Office/Allegiance

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  6. Summer concerts at Peabody Library to start — virtually

    by Nancy Beal

    Music in the Library was a popular summer feature — until the coronavirus put a stop to it last summer. After a year of learning to live virtually, it is only natural that library staff bring the tradition back — virtually — and that is how this summer’s concerts will be delivered to their patrons.

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  7. Cooper’s Pledge raises funds for Lion of Judah football

    Cooper Robicheau has, for many years, raised money to help others in his community. This month he put his efforts into raising money for Lion of Judah football, which runs faith-based football programs in and around Machias throughout the warmer months. “My brother and I have been a part of Lion of Judah Football League for six years now,” said Robicheau. “I want to give back to a program that has impacted my life. I would like to raise money to get new helmets for the league."

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  8. The Nature of Phenology: Beltane

    by Hazel Stark

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  9. Public hearing looks at proposed grant for new Machias business

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    A public hearing will help Machias voters learn about a proposed Community Block Development Grant (CDBG) in support of a restaurant and brewery which aims to open at 101 Court Street this year. The hearing will be held in person and online on Thursday, April 29, at the Machias Telebusiness Center and on Zoom.

    Machias residents will vote on the proposed grant application on May 12.

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  10. Business surges after local news coverage of Binkies Bunny Treats

    by Praise Moore

    This newspaper covered Machias business Binkies Bunny Treats and its teen entrepreneur, Grace Moore, in February [Local Machias girl runs thriving global bunny business, MVNO, Feb. 10, 2021]. Since the story broke, Moore’s business has leaped in part because Moore was then offered an interview by the News Station ABC-7. “There was a particular uptick in sales located in Maine and Bangor where all the news coverage reached,” says Moore. “Sales now average above 20 orders a week.“

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  11. Expired comprehensive plans hamper Moosabec planners

    by Nancy Beal

    Town officials in the Moosabec communities of Beals and Jonesport learned recently that their comprehensive plans, approved by the state and respective towns over 10 years ago, have expired. Their expiration not only suspends the growth and planning measures they contained but, more significantly for selectmen hoping to bring improvements to their areas, cancels a key component required by most funding entities.

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  12. Elder abuse mounting scourge of everyday life in 2021

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Seeping into the cracks of real life and tough living, the tentacles of elder abuse are many and varied.

    Bank tellers are on the lookout for the signs of financial exploitation. Medical providers are always on alert for the signs of physical abuse. Neglect is often more difficult to determine without gaining entry to the home of the elderly person in question. But for those on the front line, the battle has gained momentum during the year of COVID.

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  13. Machias selectboard talks hybrid cruiser, police wages

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    The town of Machias will soon own its first hybrid police cruiser, a purchase unanimously supported by the Machias Board of Selectmen at their regular bi-monthly meeting held last Wednesday, April 14.

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  14. All enemies, foreign and domestic

    by Jonathan Reisman

     

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  15. Just a Jonesboro boy

    by Wayne Smith

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  16. Online workshop to teach mixed media basketry

    Next in EAC's popular series of online workshops is Beginning Basketry with Sara Myrick, 1-3 pm, Sunday, May 2. Geared for ages 12 and up, the workshop will be a fun and interactive tutorial in making a box-shaped basket using a form and twine. Sara will also show adaptations to the project, including using different weaving materials like fabric scraps, recycled paper, etc.

    “I love this project,” enthuses Myrick, who frequently favors accessible, upcycled materials in her projects, “because of the versatility and practicality built into it."

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  17. Gardner follows in family’s public service footsteps

    Congratulations to Hayden Gardner for graduating from the Maine Criminal Justice Basic Corrections Academy last week. Though completed remotely,  a lot of work and study are required.

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  18. The Nature of Phenology: Violets

    by Hazel Stark

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  19. Milbridge Theatre groundbreaking signals bright future for town, arts

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Years of fundraising and creative community events resulted in Monday’s milestone groundbreaking of the upcoming Milbridge Theatre and Community Arts Center.

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  20. Restoration moves ahead on Machiasport’s Liberty Hall

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Port Road drivers have enjoyed the renewed beauty of historic Liberty Hall since 2009, when a $1.1 millon exterior restoration project was completed on the former Machiasport town hall. Now another project is underway, this time out of drivers’ sight.

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  21. Joint tech school up and running in Columbia

    by Nancy Beal

    Career technical education (CTE) has existed in coastal Washington County for years. Many law enforcement personnel in the Sunrise County and beyond began their training in the criminal justice program at Narraguagus High School. In the late 1990s, the building trades teacher at Machias Memorial High School took his class to Florida to help clean up and rebuild after a hurricane. Next week, the culinary arts students at MMHS will offer home-cooked (bagged) lunches to benefit a summer camp for teens (see details below).

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  22. Kitten season is anything but cute for animal shelters

    What may sound cute to the general public causes a shudder every year among animal shelter staff across the country.  

    “Kitten Season,” as it’s known in the animal welfare field, starts each spring and lasts through fall. Like the term implies, it’s the time of year when un-spayed female cats have most of their litters and animal shelters are inundated by orphaned kittens who need intensive care.  

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  23. Random observations

    by Jonathan Reisman

     

    • The ice went out on Cathance Lake on April 1st, two to three weeks before “normal”. Clearly, a sign of the climate change apocalypse that Governor Mills and her fellow climate alarmists have been mewling about and demanding we stop using fossil fuels (only the basis of our civilization). The carbon warming apocalypse has so far meant earlier planting times, a longer growing season, record crop outputs (carbon dioxide is also known as plant food) and steady employment for climate alarmists. It must be stopped.

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  24. Gravedigger Hall

    by Wayne Smith

    With over 50 years of digging graves, 76-year-old Everard Hall of Milbridge has dug over 2,500 graves. He has a gravedigger's scrapbook with obituaries and photos. Hall tells his story to me in his own words. He grew up poor as he quit school to take care of his family. Hall has a special tool that helps him dig graves. He calls it Everard, after his first name.

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  25. Pembroke historian keeps sea chanties alive Downeast

    by Praise Moore

    Stephen Sanfilippoand his wife have been singing sea chanties since their early twenties. Now, Sanfilippo will be 73 in September. As he pulled out his banjo, guitar, and a whole bag filled with books and papers on sea chanties, anyone could see how passionate he was on the subject.

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  26. Former UMM professor named new MIE Superintendent

    The former University of Maine at Machias Chemistry Professor and Machias resident, Dr. Reza Namin Named New Superintendent of Maine Indian Education. Maine Indian Education serving Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, Wabanaki Nations and has three schools Indian Island School, Indian Township School, and the current Beatrice Rafferty School under new school construction to be named Sipayik Elementary School.

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  27. The Nature of Phenology: Dandelions

    by Hazel Stark

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  28. Canceled due to COVID-19: Machias Wild Blueberry Festival 2021

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    The Machias Wild Blueberry Festival will not happen for the second year in a row due to the COVID-19 pandemic, festival organizers announced today, April 9.

    “It was a hard decision. We really just did not see how we could safely put on a festival,” said festival committee chair Ellen Farnsworth, pointing to festival events that take place in close quarters, like the blueberry musical. “That couldn’t have happened. Even the vendors, how could we guarantee that we were keeping our vendors safe? There were just too many things.”

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  29. Recently reunited, Jonesport’s ‘Palmer Twins’ prepare to celebrate 90 years

    by Nancy Beal

    Identical twins Rosalie Carver and Lucille Woodward were born in Jonesport 90 years ago and have lived there all their lives. Inseparable until the coronavirus pandemic-imposed isolation on their world, they had been in contact, physically, nearly every day of their lives. Last week, after the expiration of the two-week waiting period following administration of the COVID-19 vaccine they couldn’t get soon enough, they celebrated with huge hugs. This weekend, they will celebrate their 90th birthday together with family.

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  30. Maritime Family Fiber in Cutler carries on family wool tradition

    by Praise Moore

    When entering the Glidden’s Cutler home, I was informed by one of the children that her mommy is a “yarn worker”.

    Lacie Glidden, the mother of three, has been a distributor of Briggs and Little Woolen Mills since 2017, but she has been traveling across the border to Briggs and Little since she was a baby, going with her parents who raise sheep at Wild Wind Farm in Bucks Harbor. “They would trade wool for yarn because obviously, you get a lot more wool than you can spin,” Glidden said.

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  31. Opioid crisis numbers climb as ‘preventable disease’ gains force

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Nationally the opioid crisis has achieved new heights, but in Maine the numbers are climbing at an even more devastating rate.

    Between 2014 until 2019, drug overdoses claimed 1,630 lives in Maine. In 2015 alone, 272 Mainers died by drug overdose. But by 2020, in that year alone a record 502 deaths by overdose motivated Gov. Janet Mills to include in her budget $2 million to promote OPTIONS (Overdose Prevention Through Intensive Outreach Naloxone & Safety).

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  32. At town meeting, Beals voters raise $109k for steel floats

    by Nancy Beal

    Floats for the town landing generated the most discussion at the Beals town meeting March 29, as well as the highest single appropriation. After nearly an hour’s back-and-forth over types of floats, the 16 citizens that attended the two-and-a-half-hour session voted to raise $105,000 for seven steel floats and tacked on $4,000 for their delivery. Jenny Fagonde, who served as clerk and made the motion for the floats, expressed the hope that a matching grant could be obtained that would pay for seven more floats.

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  33. As warmer weather nears, local swim coach hosts water safety Q&A for parents with small children

    by Natalie Boomer

    As summer approaches us here in Maine, many locals will be introducing their young children to the water.

    Maine Families of Washington County has partnered with lifeguard, swim instructor, and USA swimming coach, Lindsay McMahon to host a water safety question and answer for parents who want to learn how to keep their children safe around water.

    McMahon will lead an interactive group discussion over Zoom on Wednesday, April 14 at 10 am.

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  34. Coastie worked at Maine Staples in Downeast Maine

    Bostonian Robert W. Hall felt fortunate to grow up along the New England coast. He and his family enjoyed so many summers on nearby Cape Cod that it’s no wonder that he went on to join the U.S. Coast Guard.

    His parents, William and Ruth Hall, had family on the Cape, and Robert spent a great deal of his time fishing for stripers and hunting with his cousin. He attended schools in Milton and graduated from Milton High School in 1955.

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  35. Inconvenient questions and politically incorrect answers

    by Jonathan Reisman

     

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  36. Rain sticks are EAC craft-along’s April Project

    Eastport Arts Center’s KinderArts program, which launched a video series in October, continues with a customizable rain stick project for April. KinderArts video instructor Nia Aretakis will demonstrate a technique for creating a child-sized rainstick out of simple household materials, and encourages participants to experiment with different ‘fillings’ for their sticks to create different sounds. Free materials kits are available from EAC, or participants can easily assemble needed supplies at home.

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  37. Online drawing group regulars discuss inspiration & connectedness

    “Assignments really help me. I get lost in too many options,” writes Sue Riddle of Pembroke, Maine, one of several artists who have participated for a year or more in the Eastport Arts Center (EAC) online portrait drawing group, interacting each week with a close-knit community formed despite social and physical distance. “I was desperately missing the arts and crafts programming I usually get through EAC and Peavey Library,” noted Riddle.

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  38. The Nature of Phenology: Kingfishers returning

    by Joseph Horn

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  39. ‘Not again!’ cries Ever Given captain, now lodged in Machias River

    by Dewey Foolem

     The Machias Police Department is directing Route 1 traffic today, Thursday, April 1, due to the spectacle of a large container vessel lodged in the Machias River below Bad Little Falls. No one knows exactly when or how the Ever Given arrived in Washington County, apparently traveling downriver from the north. 

     “I thought I heard something go by last night,” said Michael Hoyt, speaking from his riverside camp in Centerville. “Usually the container ships make more noise.”

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  40. DOT seeks public feedback on Machias dike alternatives

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Fourteen options for repairing the Machias dike bridge, ranging from small changes to full removal of the causeway, are outlined in an online public hearing available until April 30.

    The Machias dike bridge carries Route 1 and the Downeast Sunrise Trail over the confluence of the Middle and Machias rivers. A causeway has spanned the 1,000-foot gap since 1868, but the current structure was built of timber cribbing, rubble, and dirt in 1930, then widened in 1944.

    On average, 8,600 vehicles cross the dike every day.

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  41. Lack of high-speed Internet unyielding in holding back Maine

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Fifteen years ago, John Baldacci was governor and the Dirigo health plan was struggling with spiraling costs. But the hot-button issue was high-speed Internet.

    All these years later, a new governor deals with issues never dreamed of back then and health costs are still scaling new heights. But the hot-button issue is still high-speed Internet.

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  42. Grow your own garden with help from WHRL and CCC

    by Natalie Boomer

    Community Caring Collaborative (CCC) and Women for Healthy Rural Living (WHRL) have combined their resources to create a project to help Washington County families with children start their very own gardens.

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  43. Jonesport takes no action on 2nd Amendment resolution

    by Nancy Beal

    Earlier this month, Jonesport Selectman Billy Milliken was asked by an out-of-towner to bring a resolution supportive of the Second Amendment before his board. The towns of Steuben and Harrington have already approved such a resolution, he said, which affirms the right of citizens to bear arms.

    Harry Fish said he supported the amendment but would not commit to the resolution without the support of the townspeople and suggested that the select board table the motion. “We could be stepping into a quagmire,” he said.

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  44. Crumbs in Calais set to reopen this week

    by Jayna Smith

    The popular eatery Crumbs is set to reopen at a new location, with a new look, and with a slight change to its name. Crumbs Cafe & Bake Shoppe is now officially Crumbs Cafe & Coffee Bar and has moved to the other end of downtown, to 405 Main Street, right across from the triangle park. The cafe will reopen at 7 a.m. on Thursday, April 1.

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  45. Pratt donation to annual Cobscook Bay races benefits Down East Hospice

    by Jayna Smith

    Last week, Ian Pratt, of Pratt Family Dealership, presented a $500 donation to Barbara Barnett, Director of Volunteer Services at Down East Hospice Volunteers (DEHV).  The donation is for sponsorship of the Cobscook Bay Races - Challenge 2021.

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