1. Fort McHenry or Fort Sumter?

    by Jonathan Reisman

     

    Donald Trump incited a riot on January 6th.  In  doing so,  he destroyed much of what he accomplished, validated the complaints about his narcissism, divisiveness and character flaws, and invalidated the legitimate grievances of his 75 million supporters about stolen elections, Black Lives Matter and Antifa “mostly peaceful” violence, arson and riots, media bias and leftist hypocrisy. He managed to legitimize the Biden crime family and provide aid and comfort to the very socialists and leftist tyranny he opposed.

    Read More
  2. Milbridge couple survives COVID-19

    by Wayne Smith

    You could call Marge Lucas and her husband, Paul, survivors of COVID-19. Both living in Milbridge, Marge talked about how it affected their lives. She talked about the darkness of their experiences as she shone a little light on it. Marge is 90 years old and Paul is in his 70’s. With COVID-19, it turned their world upside down. Paul walks side to side. He likes his coffee. He never will give up his cigarettes. That’s kind of his best friend today.

    Read More
  3. A virtual introduction to nature therapy program offered

    Have you ever been touched by nature? Are you craving that connection again? Nature heals all: body, mind, and spirit. Join Susan Fortin on Zoom, for a reflection of Nature’s way of nurturing which will be hosted by the Beth C. Wright Cancer Resource Center on Thursday, Jan. 28 from 1 – 2:30 pm.

    This virtual introduction to Shinrin-Yoku (Forest Bathing or nature therapy), you can escape and share experiences beyond your backyard as the group will Experience Virtually: Outdoor Living in and near Acadia National Park.

    Read More
  4. Eastport City Council votes in favor of reinstating fired police chief

    by Jayna Smith

    On Monday night, Jan. 4, Eastport City Council met for “a hearing on a Request for a Notice of Appeal” to the council “by an Employee with Regard to Termination of Employment.”  After approximately two hours of discussion, the council voted in favor to reinstate Police Chief Peter Harris.

    Harris was hired by the Eastport Police Department in July of 2018 and appointed interim chief in April 2019. According to Harris, on Sept. 28, 2020, he was terminated by city manager Thomas Hoskins.

    Read More
  5. The Nature of Phenology: Snow Flies

    by Hazel Stark

    Read More
  6. Feds propose new whale regulations

    by Nancy Beal

    The long-awaited federal proposal for intensifying the rules under which commercial lobstermen are allowed to fish in the Gulf of Maine was made public last week. On December 31, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued a proposed “Risk Reduction Rule” to modify the Atlantic Large Whale Take Reduction Plan. These are its recommendations for enhanced restrictions on already existing rules concerning the configuration of gear that involves vertical lines in the water.

    Read More
  7. Norman Nelson: a community institution now 10 years gone

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Norman Nelson, a lively lover of life with extraordinary talents and life experiences, passed away a decade ago this season.

    He was always a man about town with many irons in the fire, but his variegated career resume and his ever-ready willingness to jump in and try something new made him a standout right up until his death at 92.

    Read More
  8. Machias Valley Baptist gets head start on Operation Christmas Child

    by Natalie Boomer

    The Machias Valley Baptist Church is hosting Operation Christmas Child in a new way. Instead of filling shoeboxes with necessities for children in need at the end of the year, they are asking for donations throughout the entire year to make it easier for the community.

    Read More
  9. COVID-19 update: Schools open, courthouse closed

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Washington County added two more deaths and two new hospitalizations to its tally in late December, bringing the county’s total hospitalizations to 19 and the total number of residents who have died with COVID-19 to four.

    In line with a statewide trend, the county’s case count nearly doubled last month, climbing from 193 on Dec. 1, 2020, to 377 on Dec. 31, 2020. Statewide, Maine’s cumulative case totals climbed from 11,976 on Dec. 1 to 24,201 on New Year’s Eve.

    Read More
  10. DECH welcomes first baby of 2021 on New Year’s Day

    Down East Community Hospital welcomes its first baby of 2021!  Amber Norton gave birth to Neil Raymond Horn on Friday, Jan. 1 at 7:20 p.m.  Neil, who weighed in at 8 pounds, 10 ounces, is the wonderful addition to the family of Amber Norton and Calvin Horn and his two “big” sisters Audree and Brielle.

    Read More
  11. Navy veteran proud to be descendent of Roger Williams

    Robert Morris is a true son of New England. Born in Attleboro, Massachusetts, he’s a descendent of Roger Williams, the founder of Rhode Island, and Lucius Garvin, the governor of Rhode Island.

    Bob’s parents, Garvin and Helen Buffinton Morris moved Bob and his siblings, Garvin Jr., John, and Judith to Lonsdale, Rhode Island, when they were young, and then to Cumberland, Rhode Island, in the village of Arnold Mills.

    The Morris family were avid worshippers and found a home at Arnold Mills Methodist Church.

    Bob follows the education path

    Read More
  12. Out and About in Columbia

    Another year is upon us and I wonder what will be in store for everyone. Will the coronavirus get worse or will we be able to get control of it and stop it? No one really knows for sure.

    2020 was sure different for all of us, school not being in, remote learning, no after school activities for the students, delivering lunches to the students three times a week last spring and having to wear face masks.

    Read More
  13. Sea Rhymes online musical event Jan. 19

    The Pembroke Historical Society invites you to participate in a sharing of traditional and contemporary songs and poems of seafaring and coastal life.  You may sing a chantey, a ditty, a ballad, or a hymn with a maritime theme, or recite a poem, or just enjoy listening to others. "SEA RHYMES" will be presented via Zoom, on Tuesday, Jan. 19, at 6 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.  We expect to have presenters not only from the State of Maine, but from many parts of the United States and Canada.

    Read More
  14. The Nature of Phenology: Sea smoke

    by Joseph Horn

    Read More
  15. Maine Wild Blueberry Commission gets preliminary data in import probe

    by Nancy Beal

    Read More
  16. DECH vaccinates 73 at its first COVID-19 clinic for staff

    On Monday, Dec. 21, Down East Community (DECH) received its first shipment of 200 Moderna COVID-19 vaccines for staff and held its first clinic on Wednesday, December 23 where 73 staff were vaccinated.  The first group will be ready for its second dose of the vaccine on January 20, 2021.

    Read More
  17. Down East Firearms raffles to support Trooper Andy Foss

    by Natalie Boomer

    A small, home-based firearms business located in Machias is hosting a benefit raffle for Maine State Trooper, Andy Foss.

    Down East Firearms has donated a Palmetto State Armory AR 15 rifle to raffle off to members of the community.

    The plan, donate the money raised to Foss and his family while he battles Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Read More
  18. TiP partners struggle to answer unmet area needs

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Although more connections and services exist in Washington County than a few years ago for cancer patients, care is still plagued by reliable access to services for disadvantaged elders living in isolation.

    Staffing shortages and diminished reimbursements have caused many long-term care facilities to shut down elsewhere in Maine, and others remain teetering on the brink of collapse. A crisis-level homeless epidemic, largely unpublicized, is now unrivaled since the Great Depression.

    Read More
  19. Machias man builds models of West Quoddy Head and other lighthouses

    by Natalie Boomer

    A local man from Machias has started building custom miniature lighthouses for people near and far.

    “My husband Ken makes them. He’s been doing it for 15 years now,” said Donna Pothier. “We moved up here 16 years ago from Boston. He lost one leg. He needed something to do so he came up with this idea. Started with small ones but then people started asking for one that fits over a well pipe and he designed one that does.”

    Read More
  20. Two eastern Maine patriots

    by Jonathan Reisman

     

    Read More
  21. Dancing the night away at the Ramada

    by Wayne Smith

    Read More
  22. The Nature of Phenology: Minks

    by Hazel Stark

    Read More
  23. MVNO's 2020 Christmas List of Lights

    Please enjoy this map to most of the area's wonderful Christmas decorations, with the compliments of the season from the Machias Valley News Observer.

     

     

    Read More
  24. DOT reevaluates Machias dike replacement plan

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    A state plan to repair and rebuild the Machias dike has gone back to the drawing board.

    The state’s 2018 plan to rebuild the dike in its current form has been moved from the development phase back to the planning phase, according to a letter to Machias Town Manager Christina Therrien dated Dec. 9. In the letter, Maine Department of Transportation Planner Nate Howard cited concerns over adverse effects on critical Atlantic salmon habitat.

    Read More
  25. The Christmas House of Hadley Lake Road

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Its snow-covered fields and forests make Hadley Lake Road especially picturesque this time of year, but that’s not the reason so many cars are there, slowly crawling along. During the month of December, Hadley Lake Road becomes the Christmas light epicenter of Washington County, thanks to the winter wonderland installed on Troy and Lynn Huffman’s front lawn.  

    “If we were on Route 1 we’d probably have a traffic jam,” laughs Troy.

    Read More
  26. Road flood fixed and other Jonesport news

    by Nancy Beal

    Jonesport selectmen had two in-person meetings last fall before going back to the Zoom format on November 18 and will continue to meet remotely through the month of January. Among the issues they have been dealing with is flooding at the Josh Woodward Brook on Route 187 just south of the Sandy River Beach District. Route 187 is a state aid road, and therefore the responsibility of the state.

    Read More
  27. Could Maine’s iconic crops be outpaced by cannabis?

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Traditionally, pridefully recognized as the home of wild blueberries and potatoes, as agricultural crops go, cannabis is now a contender vying for economic first place.

    Adverse weather conditions and the pandemic managed to plague both blueberries and potatoes this season. Less demand from China and an uneven playing field with Canada, crippled wild blueberries even further.

    Read More
  28. Two local hospitals among first slated to receive Moderna vaccine

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon and Jayna Smith

     

    Two Washington County hospitals will receive their first distributions of the coronavirus vaccine this week.

    Read More
  29. You’ve got mail

    One of the pleasures (and some of the pain) of punditry is the feedback I get from readers near and far. Here is a sampling from 2020, anonymized when it was an e-mail direct to me, as I do not have permission to share their identities.

    “Biden Crime Family” triggers responses

    Read More
  30. An interview with old St. Nick

    by Wayne Smith

    My yearly interview with Santa Claus on Christmas week.     

    The phone was busy — it took me a few times — but I got through to Santa Claus at the North Pole. One of the elves answered and told me that Santa was running on his treadmill, getting ready for his journey to the rest of the world on Christmas Eve as he delivers all the presents. Santa wanted to be in shape. The elves told me that Santa was listening to Christmas music on his iPod, wearing his red sweatpants and sweatshirt. As I waited, Santa called me back.

    Read More
  31. Bodman family donates piano to Washington Academy

    This is the season of giving, so it is fitting that on Friday, December 4, a beautiful Yamaha piano was delivered to Washington Academy’s Talbot Dormitory common area. The piano belonged to Mrs. Gloria Bodman, a dedicated musician, who taught music in the Machias area for decades. Mrs. Bodman recently relocated to Arizona. Her daughter, Lynn, grew up playing the piano and is ecstatic to know it is at Washington Academy (WA) and being appreciated by young musicians.

    Read More
  32. The Nature of Phenology: Needle ice

    by Joseph Horn

    Read More
  33. Martha Jane Foster

    November 12, 1936 - December 12, 2020

     

    Read More
  34. Winter sports season late, but still coming

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    High school basketball is the reigning monarch of the Downeast sports year, so it’s no wonder parents and athletes have been eagerly watching to see how — or if — this season will proceed, in light of the coronavirus pandemic. On Friday, Dec. 4, the Maine Principals Association (MPA) revised its November guidance and pushed out the start of team basketball practices from Dec. 14 to Jan. 4, but left “skills and drills” on the calendar to begin Dec. 7. Local schools are planning accordingly.

    Read More
  35. Basketball back at J-BHS; some remote learners’ parents unhappy

    by Nancy Beal

    There will be no mid-winter tourney in Bangor to look forward to in 2021 and no gold ball to bring home to a trophy case already full of them, but Royal basketball will return to the gym at Jonesport-Beals High School this week, after the Moosabec CSD board that governs the joint high school voted December 9 to allow the sport for which that school is legendary to go forward.

    Read More
  36. ‘Brutal honesty’ required to boost Maine’s economy

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Focusing on long-term growth and pervasive action, Maine’s annual Measures of Growth report signals ambitious goals for 2021.

    For landmark developments to take root, Yellow Light Breen, president and CEO of the Maine Development Foundation, says “brutal honesty and unquenchable optimism” will be required if necessary results are to be achieved. By law, the MDF is the staff of the growth council.

    Read More
  37. Cherryfield keeps holiday spirit alive for children

    by Natalie Boomer

    A Holiday Cheer Scavenger Hunt has begun in Cherryfield!

    All school aged children of the area are invited to grab a list from Mathew’s Store, the Cherryfield Library, or from the bulletin board at the post office, and start hunting.

    The list includes 16 questions to answer. Some of the questions asked are, “What is the number of the mailbox that is decorated in lights?”, “Where can you find a light up flag pole?”, and “Where is the memorial tree for our loved ones' past?”.

    Read More
  38. Town settled with former Machias dispatcher

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    A settlement agreement between the town of Machias, Teamsters Union Local No. 340, and former Machias dispatcher Tyler Wagoner was reached in late September, according to legal documents obtained by this newspaper.

    Those documents show the town of Machias paid Wagoner a total of $20,200 including a lump sum of $16,000, and the equivalent of 350 hours of sick leave, or $4,200. The documents offer no insight into the town’s rationale for the settlement.

    Read More
  39. DECH bids Dr. Rathod a fond farewell

    Down East Community Hospital bids a fond farewell to Urologist, Dr. Dhanvant Rathod, who gave 16 years of dedicated service to the hospital and the community.

    Read More
  40. Earthquake rattles Robbinston and beyond

    by Jayna Smith

    On the morning of Wednesday, Dec. 9, social media reports from many in the area noted “rattles” and “rumbles.” According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), a magnitude 3 earthquake occurred around 7:30 a.m.  It had a depth of roughly 4.784 miles.

    The epicenter of the quake was at Trimble Mountain, and its effects were felt as far away as Baileyville.  No damage was reported.

    Read More
  41. The sadness of entropy

    by Jonathan Reisman

     

    Things fall apart; the center cannot hold - W.B. Yeats

    Entropy is a concept from chemistry and physics that measures the state of disorder in a system. The second law of thermodynamics makes it clear that disorder in a system will increase over time without external intervention- or as more poetically put by poet William Butler Yeats, “Things fall apart; the center cannot hold”.

    Read More
  42. Cobscook Institute plans online creative program

    As we enter into the dark months of another Downeast winter, Cobscook Institute will build community and spark creativity through online community programming.

    Read More
  43. Local student raises funds to raise spirits for NICU families

    by Sarah Craighead Dedmon

    Read More
  44. Relief funds give greatly to feed Mainers

    by Ruth Leubecker

    Homelessness and hunger, tandem travelers in these times of COVID-19, are capturing the attention of many support groups and community partners.
    Maine itself has invested $536,000 in virus relief funds for Meals on Wheels. The  number of such meals has more than doubled just from October to November, now having served 102,000 meals to 5,500 people.  

    Read More
  45. Moosabec schools experiencing mixed attendance

    by Nancy Beal

    The three schools in Union 103 (Beals, Jonesport Elementary Schools and the joint high school) have been open for in-person learning since the Thanksgiving recess, but not all students’ families are sending them. The return to in-person attendance, decided by a joint committee composed of representatives from all facets of the schools, was prompted by reports from the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention that schools are safer than the community in this COVID-19 world.

    Read More

Pages

Pages